Bonus Junkies Review – It’s a SCAM & You Won’t Get Paid

Dale

Bonus Junkies (found at BonusJunkies.co) calls itself the #1 influencer network in the world & claims it can enable people to earn as much as $500 to $1,000 per day.

Bonus Junkies Website ScreenshotYou’re led to believe that to earn money with the website all you need to do is sign up & invite friends.

They promise that they’ll pay you between $15 & $25 for every person that you get to join.

Simple, right?

But is Bonus Junkies actually legit? Or is Bonus Junkies a scam that you should avoid?

Well, I’m glad that you came here to my Bonus Junkies review before you signed up because I can immediately tell you that it’s NOT legit and that nobody who joins will ever get paid.

You’ll see what’s really going on (and how you can protect yourself from getting scammed if you’ve already joined) in my honest & detailed Bonus Junkies review below.

What Is Bonus Junkies?   |   How Does Bonus Junkies Work?   |   Red Flags   |   Fake Payment Proof   |   The Dangers (And How To Protect Yourself)   |   Is Bonus Junkies a Scam?   |   A Better Alternative

What Is Bonus Junkies?

Bonus Junkies is a website that promises to provide social media users with an easy way to make lots of money.

According to them, in order to make money with their website all you need to do is simply sign up (for free) and then share it with others & encourage them to sign up.

If they click through your unique referral link & sign up, you’ll earn between $15 & $25.

At least that’s what they tell you, anyway.

And they claim that because there’s no limit on the amount of people you can refer, you can supposedly earn as much as $500 to $1,000 per day with ease.

But the problem is that it’s simply not true.

None of the members that join Bonus Junkies will ever get paid.

I can say that so confidently because I’ve actually seen the Bonus Junkies scam in the past.

It’s what’s known as a “churn and burn” type of scam because the creators launch under one name, then shortly after they relaunch it again under another name in an attempt to escape the negative reviews people write exposing the truth about it.

Some of its previous names include:

The website is just a phoney & in the next section of this Bonus Junkies review, you’ll see what’s really going on & how the Bonus Junkies scam actually works.

How Does Bonus Junkies Work?

Bonus Junkies is what’s known as a viral data-harvesting scam.

They claim that if you sign up & refer friends, you’ll be able to earn money, but that’s not true.

In reality, all they’re doing is trying to collect data from as many people as possible (such as emails, usernames, passwords) & they’ve created a fake opportunity to do it.

You sign up in the hope of being able to make money, and by doing so, you’ve given them your data.

Then they tell you that the way you make money is by referring others, but the reality is that you’ll just be unknowingly luring others into the scam & promoting it for them.

Nobody who joins will ever get paid.

And that’s easy to see when you step back & look at the opportunity because there’s literally no money coming into the company to pay anybody with.

Everybody is simply signing up for free.

You sign up for free, then you get others to sign up for free, and they get others to sign up for free.

As a result, there’s simply no way Bonus Junkies could afford to pay anybody the promised amounts of $15 to $25 per referral.

They’ve just made up a fake number (and made it seem like a potentially lucrative opportunity) so that people will sign up just to “try it out”.

But the second somebody signs up to “try it out”, the Bonus Junkies scam has worked. They’ve got their data.

What they’re doing with the data is the worst part, though.

You see the scammers behind Bonus Junkies are relying on the fact that most people use the same credentials (email/username/password) for every website that they visit.

And it’s true, according to Sophos security they do.

So they’re simply hoping that you’ll sign up to Bonus Junkies using the same details that you use for other websites (such as Facebook, Twitter & PayPal etc).

They’ll then try to find accounts associated with your details, and if you did indeed sign up to Bonus Junkies using the same details then they’ll be able to break into them.

Not good.

Further down this Bonus Junkies review, you’ll learn how you can protect yourself if you have indeed already joined.

The Red Flags

For a start, there’s the fact that the whole thing sounds WAY too good to be true & as the old saying goes, if something sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

In this case, it definitely is.

I can tell you as an experienced online marketer that there is simply no way the Bonus Junkies website could be earning enough money to pay people $15 to $25 per referral from advertising alone, as they claim they are.

But on top of that, there are several other red flags.

For example, there’s the fact that Bonus Junkies has already been seen under several different names such as Survey Junkies, Tap2Cash, Influencer Cash, Social Bounty, Use2Earn & many more.

There’s also the fact that despite claiming the be the #1 influencer network in the world, the Bonus Junkies website (according to a domain age checker) was only launched 14 days ago:

Bonus Junkies Domain Age

And on top of that, there’s the fact that Bonus Junkies lists its address as just “Houston, TX” and has absolutely no social media presence whatsoever.

Plus, coincidently, none of the “testimonials” shown on the homepage can be verified as the usernames of the account all happen to be misspelt & not hyperlinked.

So there’s a LOT of red-flags, to say the least.

Fake Payment Proof

The Bonus Junkies website features a payment proof page which has been put together in a clear attempt to try to convince you that the website is legit & really pays.

The problem?

All of the so-called payment proof on that page is completely fake.

The reason I am able to tell that is because I ran a reverse search on the images using the Google reverse image search tool & the images were linked to other scam sites.

Here’s an example:

Bonus Junkies Payment Proof

The images above show that one of the payment proof images shown on the Bonus Junkies website also appears on the CashInfluence & InfluencersEarn websites.

Those are 2 other known scams that I’ve previously exposed right here on this website.

The Dangers (And How To Protect Yourself)

The danger for people who have signed up to Bonus Junkies is that their other online accounts may be compromised.

You see, the people behind Bonus Junkies are basically hoping that you sign up to their website using the same details that you happen to use elsewhere.

They’ll then attempt to find other accounts associated with your details (such as Facebook, Twitter, PayPal, etc) and break into them.

So this means that if you have indeed signed up to Bonus Junkies using details that you use to sign in elsewhere then you should go ahead & change those details ASAP.

As an example, if you signed up to Bonus Junkies using the same details that you use to login to Facebook then you should head to Facebook & change your details there.

Providing your details are different, the people behind Bonus Junkies won’t be able to gain access to your account.

And if you’ve already shared Bonus Junkies with others then it’s also recommended that you share this Bonus Junkies review with them too so that they can learn how to protect their accounts as well.

Is Bonus Junkies a Scam?

Yes, absolutely. Bonus Junkies is definitely a scam & the evidence proving that (as highlighted throughout this Bonus Junkies review) is absolutely overwhelming.

The website is set out to do nothing other than steal your personal data so that the people behind it can attempt to compromise your other online accounts.

And as mentioned further up in this review, the scam has already been seen several times before launched under various different names.

Some of those names included Survey Junkies, Clout Bonus, PaidNova & Use2Earn.

The money Bonus Junkies promise to pay members is simply not real & therefore nobody that joins Bonus Junkies will ever find themselves actually getting paid.

It should be avoided.

Instead, if you really want to earn money online legitimately then I would suggest you look into affiliate marketing.

Through affiliate marketing, you’ll be able to earn good money by promoting products for 3rd party companies like Amazon online & it’s actually the same method I use myself.

If you’d like to learn more about it (or learn how to get started with it) then you can check out my free guide here.

A Better Alternative

The sad truth is that unfortunately most of the programs promising to help you make money online are scams. I can say that confidently after exposing over 500+ of them here on this blog.

But the good news is that even though most of them are indeed scams, there are actually some very good programs in amongst them - some programs that can truly help you to earn money.

And out of all of the legit programs I've seen, the one I would recommend the most to anybody looking to get started online is Wealthy Affiliate. In my own opinion, that's the best place to start.

At Wealthy Affiliate, you'll be provided with everything you need (including the training & tools) to begin earning real money by promoting products or services for companies like Amazon online.

The best part is that there's literally no limit on the amount you can earn with it & the process is pretty simple which means that it's absolutely perfect for people that don't have much experience.

Some wealthy affiliates even earn as much as 5-figures per month... Or more!

Amazon Earnings Example

I mean don't get me wrong, that kind of money won't just fall into your lap without doing any work... But the harder you're willing to work at it, the more you stand to earn with it.

So if you're looking to get started but don't know which route you should go down or which program you should join (and don't want to waste money on bogus things that don't actually work), then I'd highly recommend checking out Wealthy Affiliate first. You can learn more about it here.

Dale
About the Author:
Born & raised in England, Dale is the founder of Living More Working Less & he has been making a living from his laptop ever since leaving his job as an electrician back in 2012. Now he shares what he's learned to help others do the same... [read more]

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